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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
'm not talking about basic weapons or weapons that are used in hunting. to the best of my knowledge, if anyone uses an assault weapon in hunting with a 30-round magazine, i would be quite surprised by that. and, by the way, if they do and because of public safety, that should go away, then i believe that should go away. [ inaudible question ] >> i think gun safety has been important to our administration, and the fact is that we are ranked as having the top five toughest laws on guns in the nation, but i will go back to what i said earlier. absent a federal framework, and i'll actually even drill down further into my own personal history. as mayor of stanford, we came to understand that a good percentage of the handguns that work their way to connecticut work their way up i-95 from states in which there are substantially easier gun laws, and guns in some cases sold under exceptions to the rule for gun shows. those guns work their way up i-95 and get to places like new york city or cities in our state, and i have always said and will continue to say that those exceptions and the absence of a to
with us on this very important nuse day. the president the nation in mourning with one clear nation. >> we can't tolerate this anymore. these tragedies must end. and to end them we must change. >> gretchen: so we will be live for you in newtown, connecticut with more from the president. >> peter: there is new information on the shooter his mother and what their relationship tells us about a possible motive. >> brian: i little girl played dead to save her own life. her store tore straight ahead. fox and friends starts right now. >> peter: welcome, folks, it is monday morning and fox and friends. the president was at the innerfaith service in connecticut. the governor said that friday was the hardest, toughest day of his presidency. today it continues with two of the little boys laid to rest. >> brian: if you saw the speech, you could see he was having a tough time. even though he's done it four times it is not easier it is getting harder. he sees his kids in those kids as all of us do. >> gretchen: even if you are not a parent you feel the horribleness. this is a trying day with many more t
know we all saw this. this is what we used to call the topic sentence. i think this was the most telling action oriented piece of what the president said last night up in connecticut. let's listen to it now. >> in the coming weeks i will use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens from law enforcement to mental health professionals to parents and educators in an effort aimed at preventing more tragedies like this. because what choice do we have? we can't accept events like this as routine. are we really prepared to say that we're powerless in the face of such carnage? that the politics are too hard? are we prepared to say that such violence visited on our children year after year after year is somehow the price of our freedom? >> chuck todd, you know, gun control was probably not in many politicians' song book going into this coming year but now it is. reality, reality checks, reality bites. do you think the president has given any sign he will do something about gun safety in this next term? >> well, if he wants to -- that speech was a powerful speech, it w
watch over us amen >> reporter: dylan hockley was also 6. he loved the trampoline in his backyard. and madeline hsu. catherine hubbard. her middle name was violet. chase kowalski played baseball outside with his dad. jesse lewis learning to ride horses. james mattioli known for his smile. grace mcdonnell who was 7 went every morning to the bus stop with her mom. emelie parker of 6 who was a budding artist who always carried around markers and pencils. jack pinto already at 6 years old already had a team, the giants and a hero, star wide receiver victor cruz. noah pozner has a twin sister, ariel, who was assigned to a different classroom and survived. noah called her his best friend. caroline previdi played soccer and hide and seek. while jessica rekos as described by her parents for the little ceo for the way she thought out and planned everything. 6-year-old benjamin wheeler's family moved from queens, new york, to newtown, connecticut, for its promise of grassy lawns and good schools. that promise has been shattered. and last night newtown prayed with the help of the president.
. and they need all of us right now. in the hard days to come that community needs us to be at our best as americans, and i will do everything in my power as president to help. because while nothing can fill the space of a lost child or loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need, to remind them that we are there for them, that we are praying for them, and that the love they felt for those they lost endures not just in their memory-- memories but also in ours. may god bless the memory of the victims. and in the words of scripture, heal the broken hearted, and bind up their wounds. >> rose: flags at the white house and the capitol are flying at half-mast in recognition of one of the worst school shootings in american history. the victims and their families are in our thoughts and prayers this evening as we air a program on a brain series about post traumatic stress disorder. after this break, our program on post traumatic disorder begins. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this
in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations take a look at the histor
it for us here in newtown. thank you for watching. "early start" begins next. ♪ >>> on this special edition of "early start," a community and a nation in mourning. >> newtown, you are not alone. >> the president, offering words of comfort and inspiration, to those trying to make sense of a senseless tragedy. >> the face of indescribable violence. in the face of unconscionable evil. you've looked out of each other. and you cared for one another. and you've loved one another. >> we're remembering the victims, 20 children and 6 adults. some who gave their lives to save others. >> she was truly selfless. she would not hesitate to save anyone else before herself, especially children. >> as more details emerge, people in the small community search for strength to face the difficult days ahead. >> we will move on. we will never forget. we will, in many ways, be made stronger for what has transpired. and we will get better. >>> good morning. and welcome to this special edition of "early start." >> it is 5:00 a.m. in the east. we're coming to you live from newtown, connecticut, this morning. it is a
you have inspired us, newtown. in the face of indescribable center lines, in the face of unconscionable evil, you looked out for each other. you cared for one another. you have loved one an is how ne remembered. >> earlier yesterday authorities told us that hundreds of rounds were fired here on friday. the president said it is now time to better protect the children who cannot protect themselves. >> can we honestly say we are doing enough to keep our children all of them safe from harm. we claim as a nation that we are all together there, letting them know we are loved and teach to go love in return. are we truly doing enough to give all the children of this country a chance they deserve to live out their lives in happiness and with purpose. i have been reflecting on this the last few days. if we are honest with ourselves, the answer is no. >>> i was at a bar that was frequented by the suspect's mother nancy lanza. there were many people at the hangout for folks in the town to go in newtown. not one person said one thing the entire time. it was completely silent. peopl
put some money into a pacific life fixed annuity. it guarantees us an income for the rest of our lives, whether social security is all there or not. hey, hey! ♪ [ laughs ] [ male announcer ] to learn more about a guaranteed lifetime income from pacific life, visit pacificlife.com. till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! could've had a v8. ♪ get to kmart for our deals to get it done 2 day sale this sunday & monday. grab great deals on family outerwear and toys! don't miss out! at kmart. >> pelley: it is a sunday of sorrow for newtown, connecticut, and for the nation. this afternoon hundreds of residents walked the road to sandy hook elementary school, where, on friday, 26 people were murdered, 20 of them children in the first grade. president obama has been in newtown tonight for a memorial service. first reports of this tragedy have turned out to be inaccurate. we were told that the gunman's mother was a teacher at the scho
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
" magazine edward lindgren. jansing and company's chris jansing joins us now. you have been on the road a lot this year to some very terrible places in the wake of some very serious american tragedies, but this one, if i dare say it, seems a little bit different. give us your sense of your take on the move -- as far as the mood on the ground and how the community is reacting m days since the tragedy. >> alex, it would be difficult to even begin to try to express the depth and the breadth of the pain that this community is feeling and will feel all weeklong. the first of a series of funerals is getting underway right now. i'll show you a page from the local paper, and there are two pages of obituaries of children. we've just learned that governor dan malloy has shown up at the funeral of little noah, 6 years old, noah posner, who has a twin and an 8-year-old sister, and there was a heartbreaking question asked in his obituary. how do you capture the essence of a 6-year-old in just a few words? when i first came here on friday, alex, i was talking to the local priest. they lost ten young parish
, bob doll will be giving us his lineup for stocks. that's coming up at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. at 8:00 eastern, a cnbc exclusive. david tepper, one of the world's top performing hedge fund managers will join us to give us some of his wisdom in a kaerc t can't-miss interview. a lot to talk about with him. in the meantime, why don't we get to some of today's top stories. we could see some movement in the fiscal cliff negotiations. house speaker boehner offering to raise the top tax rates on those making over $1 million a year as well as other measures amounting to $1 trillion in new revenue. that's in exchange for an equal amount in spending cuts. the white house has not yet accepted the proposal. >>> also, apple says it has sold more than 2 million in iphone 5s in china just over the last three days. that's the best ever debut for the iphone line in china. apple is china's second biggest market, although it did lose a lot of market share while they were waiting for that i5 to come out. and citi research has downgraded apple from a hold to a buy. you can see there just below $500. >>
? straight to the firehouse? >> straight to the firehouse. from there, we just -- >> help us around the world understand what you, as a first responder, are going through. >> sadness, anger, guilt in some aspects. >> why guilt? what could you have done? >> exactly. we were having counseling. as a group. >> can i get your first and last name? >> name's jeffrey thomas. >> jeffrey thomas. since high school. what do you make of the preeths, ju wreaths, people you don't know sending you all these wreaths to put up in town. what would you say to the people of portland, oregon? >> thank you. it makes us feel warm to know this is -- it is amazing that people that far away care about us. >> two simple words, thank you. and we have also now learned that the u.s. senate, members of the senate, have observed a moment of silence. want to take a moment here, take a look. >> i now ask that the united states senate observe a moment of silence to honor the victims of the sandy hook elementary school tragedy. >> mr. president -- >> majority leader. >> the following remarks -- >> just wanted to share that momen
's largest church, will give us her perspective as we enter the fiebl final week before the christmas holiday. >> nbc's lester holt is here with more on the tragedy. good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. tough weekend. the community needed the president to come here. he met with the first responders, the families. the speech he delivered was not one that many expected. he offered words of comfort, he also laid down a political gauntlet. for the fourth time since taking office, president obama stood before a community shattered by mass murder to offer words of comfort. >> i can only hope it helps for you to know that you're not alone in your grief. >> the president called last friday the worst day of his presidency. and this time he came with more than words of consolation. the president, sketching the outlines of what amounted to a policy statement on gun violence. >> can we honestly say we're doing enough to keep our children, all of them, safe from harm? i've been reflecting this on this the last few days and if we're honest with ourselves, the answer is no. in the coming weeks, i
nurse. >> sally cox. she'll be with us in a minute. >>> let's get right to the presidents right now. he spoke last night. he came here and met with the families. he was with allison, the granddaughter of the school principal. the president comforted the families yesterday. then delivered the speech. he told the people of newtown, they're not alone. a powerful call to action. a president filled with angry. >> i come to offer the love and prayers of a nation. mere words cannot match the depths of your sorrow. nor can they heal your wounded hearts. you're not alone in your grief. >> reporter: consolation first. and then, a call to action. >> this is our first task. caring for our children. if we don't get that right, we don't get anything right. can we truly say, as a nation, that we're meeting our obligations? the answer is no. these tragedies must end. and to end them, we must change. >> reporter: president obama, stricken and stern, promised to make america safer for our children. >> i'll use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens in an effort aimed at preventing
, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the incoming president they are leaving the house getting ready for t
there, and they are analyzing that to see what they can get out of it. >> what can you tell us about what happened if what was the scenario? >> well, it all starts friday morning when he takes his mother's guns. she had purchased them legally. this is a woman who grew up in rural new hampshire, comfortable with guns, collected them. he killed her. takes three of the guns to the school. drives there in her car. forces his way in, apparently by shattering a window. they had a buzzer system. he forced his way in. the principal and the school psychologist tried to stop him. he killed them. and then concentrated his firepower on two classrooms with devastating effect. and, david, the detail that was show sho so shocking is he used an assault-style weapon. a term that bothers some people. but a bushmaster 223, the same weapon that the washington snipers used 10 years ago, and shot these children several times, some as many as 10 and 11 times. so you can only imagine the devastating effect that that had. >> the shooter, adam lanza, who took his own life. we have an older picture of him, the
to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. .. >> i didn't know what to do about it. all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about the experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had i have no words for it, other than adolescence. other than going out. finally, people were starting to stand back and say that this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. the director, lee hirsch and i started talking about this. voices started bubbling up to the service. this is not something we can expect from a normal culture. in april of 2009, it was right after to young people took their lives. both of those tragedies, i think really ignited a national recognition of what was going on for so long. and we were seeing parents writing into message boards. we were seeing every news story that. hundreds of comments from parents saying that my child is going through this. kids thing that i'm going through t
to carry out his deadly massacre. we begin with coverage from abc's tahman bradley. >> he joins us live from newtown where the grieving will take a more private turn later today. good morning, tahman. >> reporter: sunny and rob, good morning to you. today is going to be another tough day for this heartbroken community. funerals will begin today and tomorrow. for some of the victims. and last night's prayer vigil, visited by president obama, is something that this community and the country will not soon forget. >> olivia. josephine. >> reporter: the more than 900 mourners who packed newtown high school heard an emotional president obama admit the country has failed them. >> since i have been president this is the fourth time we have come together to comfort a grieving community torn apart by mass shootings. >> reporter: he said he'll use the power of the presidency to stop tragedies like the massacre of 26 children and adults at sandy hook elementary school. >> these tragedies must end. to end them, we must change. >> reporter: outside the vigil where president obama spoke, an emotional
and their families. so, thank you so much, cynthia, for being here today. why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself. how did you get here? how did you get drawn into the issue? y "bully," why now? >> guest: i come from a background as a writer and when i was in school i was one of those kids who was really shy, and i tried to sail under the radar and i was someone that solid taking place around me and i didn't know what to do about it. and as all of us i think in this country were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had no words for it other than adolescents other than growing up. finally people were starting to stand back and say hold on, this isn't actually a normal part of growing up, this isn't a normal right of passage. i think there was a moment when there was a possibility for change, and the director and i decided to start the film out of the feeling that voices were kind of bubbling up coming to the surface to say this isn't something that we can acc
, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a re
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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